5 Things You Can Do Today to Set Yourself Up for a Promotion in Sales

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You know the feeling. You’ve been selling for a few years, you’re regularly hitting your numbers, and you think you’re ready for a promotion. But sales is a labor-intensive job. The day-to-day stress can be deflating, and most of the time, it takes everything you’ve got just to meet your goal.

So, how do you get to the next level without taking your foot off the revenue pedal? Not by working an extra three hours every day—that’s only going to burn you out. Instead, do a few little things every day to flex your leadership muscles and still meet goal.

Here are five smalls tasks to incorporate into your daily workflow to build towards a promotion. And remember, it’s not about getting the position, it’s about becoming the person who deserves the position.

1. Help Your Colleagues

You might not have the title of sales leader, but by helping your co-workers you can start being a leader on your floor today. After all, a title won’t make people follow you, their trust and belief in you will—and you don’t need a title to build that.

New reps always need help when they start. Ask if you can help them ramp up and find success. It might be as simple as telling them how to access certain software or letting a new rep listen to a few of your calls. Or, offer to do a few ride-alongs.

When you have small talk with co-workers, ask them how they’re doing and really listen to their response. Then, ask to help.

A few months ago, I noticed a recently promoted colleague struggling to perform. We decided to review a few call recordings and see if we could identify gaps. Turns out, an hour of my time was enough to kick his performance into high gear.

2. Stop Eating Alone

If you’re like me, you’re glued to your computer and phone most of the day, spilling lunch on your keyboard and slurping down quick mugs of coffee on your way back from the kitchen.

Instead of staring at your screen for 10 straight hours, use lunch or coffee breaks to network. If you sell for a company with multiple sales teams, meet with reps and leadership in other teams to learn what their segments are experiencing.

Learn how they made it to where they are today. What was their first job? Did they attend any special trainings or classes? What was their big break, and what did they do once they got there? Pick someone who’s career you’d like to emulate and ask them what steps you should take to achieve the same type of growth.

3. Understand the Skills You Need

And find out how to get them. Be honest with yourself—you’ll need to know how to do more than hit an individual quota when it comes to managing a team.

If you’re a great salesperson but don’t know how to interview people, ask your boss, “If I hit 115% of goal, can I sit in on your next interview call?”

Have hiring down but need to be better at running efficient meetings? Ask for the opportunity to run your team’s weekly call review if you exceed next month’s goal. Need to work on one-on-one coaching? Ask if you can mentor someone on the sales team.

It might be hard in the beginning, but telling your boss you’d rather receive these opportunities than a bonus will show how serious you are about making it to the next level.

4. Solve a Problem

To find growth opportunities, look for company or team gaps and fill them. Is there a communication gap between sales and marketing? Find out how to fix it. Does your company have a major initiative coming up? Get ahead by solving for potential pain paints.

I knew someone who kept getting crushed by competitors when he was a sales rep. He was selling software that was difficult to install, and his competitors beat him every time because they had partnerships with software implementation specialists.

Instead of taking this problem to his boss and complaining, he made his own deal with an implementation company and started winning business—a lot of business.

His company took notice of the increased volume and asked for his secret. When he told them what he’d been doing, they decided to scale his partnership framework and put him in charge.

5. Always Be Learning

Leadership requires a broad skill set, and reading gives you the alternative strategies you need to excel in your daily work. If you’re not reading sales books and blogs, you should be.

Think you don’t have time? Load up on sales and leadership podcasts or audiobooks on your commute or while you’re cooking dinner.

And, if your company offers class reimbursement, take advantage and enroll in local or online seminars.

Lastly, regularly attend meetups or other networking events in your city. You can learn as much from other people facing similar challenges as you can from the pages of a book.

It’s one thing to want a promotion and another thing to work for one. Start by incorporating these five strategies into your workflow, and see your manager and co-workers take notice.

 

https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-get-a-promotion-in-sales

 

ARE YOU IN NEED OF TOP TALENT NOW? Don’t have the time to spend nor available bandwidth to look for your company’s perfect match? Does this leave you with projects undone, unable to launch new initiatives or deliver desired output, let alone to grow your profits? Is your hiring process stalled and limping along with unfilled requisitions? Discover the ease and satisfaction of partnering with experts whose ONLY mission is to accomplish laser-focused search and to acquire top-tier skill on your behalf, each and every day! Contact us at 415-234-0707  or email at connect@superiansources.com Find out what a customized service SAVES you in TIME, MONEY and RESOURCES!

ARE YOU TODAY’S TOP TALENT LOOKING FOR A NEW ROLE? Do you want assurance that you are represented by the best and have opportunities open to you within exceptional workplaces? Have you heard that being presented by a boutique search firm is the edge you need to get in the door and have your opportunity to shine? Contact us at 415-234-0707 or email at  connect@superiansources.com – http://www.SuperianSources.com

 

 

Refer a Friend:

Refer a friend to Superian Sources for employment opportunities.

Once they are hired through our service, you receive a $100 gift card.

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7 Ways to Find the Answer to “What Should I Do With My Life?”

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What should I do with my life?”

Unlike so many other questions you have about your career, this one’s not quite as easy to Google. (Or—shameless plug—to look up on The Muse.)

The good news is, you’re not alone—in fact, I’ll guarantee that everyone has pondered their career path, finding their passion, or what they’re meant to be doing at some point. And luckily, many of them are willing to share their advice. If you’re at a loss for what steps to take next, read on for the best pieces of advice from a recent Quora thread on this very issue.

1. Talk to People

Meet or call at least 50 people. They can be your friends, relatives, friends of friends/references. Call them up, schedule a meeting, go see them and interact with them on what they are doing. Don’t expect anything, don’t ask them to find you a job, don’t ask them to give you a job. Just talk and meet and have a normal conversation.

Gaurav Munjal

You’d be surprised at how much you can learn just listening to other people talk. OK, yes, sometimes you might not learn much more than how badly traffic was backed up during rush hour. But other times, if you listen (and listen between the lines), you’ll get insight into people’s motivations, hopes, dreams, and ambitions. And when you piece all that together, you can learn how others got to where they are today—and if that’s a path you want to be on, too.

2. Get Started

My suggestion is to do something. Even if it isn’t quite the right thing, it is nevertheless movement that can give you an opportunity to experience. You can spend a lot of time taking tests and getting evaluations for what you might be suited for; ideas always sound good on paper. But words don’t match experience, so acting on something is your best choice.

Kathleen Grace

Regardless of what you generally want to do, it never hurts to start building something. Really anything. Get your portfolio up and running, launch a newsletter, or learn how Periscope works. There are so many things you can do for your career—even if you don’t know what you want to do. And, just like the previous advice, the actual act of simply doing will help further clarify what paths you might want to be on, and which ones you should rule out.

3. Gather Inspiration From Others

Walk into your local bookshop and go straight to the autobiography section. Buy three books from across different industries, societies, and cultures. Focus on biographies that document great and successful people’s early lives, before they were great. Read them before bed. Wake up in the morning and write down 10 things you could do differently that day. Do some of them. Do this the next day. And then do it again.

David Ball

No matter what you do, you probably want to be successful at it. So what better way to get started than by learning how others reached their goals? Keep in mind as you’re reading that these people weren’t born knowing what they wanted to do either.

4. Prepare for a Long Journey

Expect that it is going to take a while and involve several iterations, or so-called “life crises” to figure it out. For most people it’s a long and often unfinished journey.

Andrei Palskoi

One huge misconception about figuring out what you want to do with your life is that you will have a sudden, magical moment of extreme clarity and then have your entire life planned.

In actuality, lives shift constantly, and you’ll need to regroup and reconsider your journey as you go along. So instead of being surprised when you have to make new decisions, anticipate them, and dare I say it, be excited for them.

5. Leave Your Comfort Zone

Try new things and widen your horizons. Try something you’ve always wanted to but never got around to, something that scares you, something that is very different from what you normally do.

Can Sar

Maybe you don’t know what you want to do because you haven’t tried what you’re meant to do yet. And you won’t know if that is true or not until you get out there and start ruling things out.

Seriously, it’s easy to get into a rut and feel like you have no options besides what you are you doing right now. However, by taking a step outside your comfort zone, you’d be surprised by how much you end up liking something that you never, in a million years, imagined you would.

6. Be Okay With Failing

Learn the skills that are needed to accomplish what you want to achieve. Most of us fail in [our] first attempt. We keep failing and learning and growing. [The] point to be noted is that this is the time to learn, experiment, grow, and fail without any substantial damage.

Anuj Kumar

Nothing will slow you down more in your quest to figure out what to do with your life more than being afraid of failure. Yes, you’ve heard this before—but that’s because it’s true. You won’t ever be able to nail down what makes you happy if you rule everything out because it sounds hard.

7. Enjoy Not Knowing

Enjoy the meanderings, the soul-searching, the loves lost, the time wasted. All of it will add up to a complex and very unique “you.” The more you appreciate right now, the more the future will become a fantastic reality. Don’t pressure yourself to be in the future.

James Altucher

You know how math problems always seem impossible when you first look at them, but then, after taking a break, the answer feels so obvious? Figuring out what you want to do with your life is kind of like that.

By focusing on other less-pressing matters, the obvious answer may just come to you when you’re least expecting it—and it will be clearer than you ever imagined it to be.

Feel better about not knowing what you want to do with your life? A little? Just remember that you don’t have to have it all figured out. And that even when you do, you might change course a few times. So don’t worry about having all the answers—just thinking about it is a good start.

 

https://www.themuse.com/advice/7-ways-to-find-the-answer-to-what-should-i-do-with-my-life

 

ARE YOU IN NEED OF TOP TALENT NOW? Don’t have the time to spend nor available bandwidth to look for your company’s perfect match? Does this leave you with projects undone, unable to launch new initiatives or deliver desired output, let alone to grow your profits? Is your hiring process stalled and limping along with unfilled requisitions? Discover the ease and satisfaction of partnering with experts whose ONLY mission is to accomplish laser-focused search and to acquire top-tier skill on your behalf, each and every day! Contact us at 415-234-0707  or email at connect@superiansources.com Find out what a customized service SAVES you in TIME, MONEY and RESOURCES!

ARE YOU TODAY’S TOP TALENT LOOKING FOR A NEW ROLE? Do you want assurance that you are represented by the best and have opportunities open to you within exceptional workplaces? Have you heard that being presented by a boutique search firm is the edge you need to get in the door and have your opportunity to shine? Contact us at 415-234-0707 or email at  connect@superiansources.com – http://www.SuperianSources.com

 

 

Refer a Friend:

Refer a friend to Superian Sources for employment opportunities.

Once they are hired through our service, you receive a $100 gift card.

Refer a business and receive a $200 gift card for the first hire.  Call or email Superian for details.

How to Negotiate Salary: 37 Tips You Need to Know

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Whether we’re starting a new job or gunning for a promotion at our current one, we all know that we should be negotiating.

Or do we?

A survey by Salary.com revealed that only 37% of people always negotiate their salaries—while an astonishing 18% never do. Even worse, 44% of respondents claim to have never brought up the subject of a raise during their performance reviews.

The biggest reason for not asking for more? Fear.

And we get it: Negotiation can be scary. But what’s even scarier is not doing it.

Here’s a good example: A famous study done by Linda Babcock for her book, Women Don’t Ask: The High Cost of Avoiding Negotiation—and Positive Strategies for Change, revealed that only about 7% of women attempted to negotiate their first salary, while 57% of men did. Of those people who negotiated, they were able to increase their salary by over 7%.

That may not sound like much, but as Stanford negotiation professor Margaret A. Neale puts it, “If you and your counterpart who negotiated are treated identically by the company—you are given the same raises and promotions—35 years later, you will have to work eight more years to be as wealthy as your counterpart at retirement.”

So, whether you’re male or female, in your first job or your fifth, it’s time to learn how to negotiate. And we’re here to help, with a roundup of expert tips and further reading to get you totally prepped for your next negotiation.

1. Know Your Value

If you’re going to get the pay you deserve, it’s crucial to know the going rate for your position in your specific industry and in your geographic area. As I Will Teach You to Be Rich’s Ramit Sethi told PureWow, “If you walk into a salary negotiation without a number, you’re at the mercy of an experienced hiring manager who will simply control the conversation.”

You can do this by doing an online search on sites such as Payscale or Glassdoor, or by asking others in your field (ideally both men and women, to avoid falling victim to the gender pay gap).

2. Talk to Recruiters

Another way to do some research? Pick up those calls from recruiters. They know what people with your experience and expertise are worth, so use it to your advantage! The next time one reaches out to you, engage in a conversation about the position’s responsibilities and pay. You may not get a specific number, but even a range is helpful.

3. Organize Your Thoughts

To organize all of your thoughts and research in one place, check out the free resources at She Negotiates (yes, it’s helpful for guys, too).

4. Pick the Top of the Range

As you’re doing your research, you’ll likely come up with a range that represents your market value. It can be tempting to ask for something in the middle of the range, but instead you should ask for something toward the top.

First of all, you should assume you’re entitled to top pay, says She Negotiates founder Victoria Pynchon.

Second, your employer will almost certainly negotiate down, so you need wiggle room to still end up with a salary you’re pleased with.

5. Know the (Exact) Number

According to researchers at Columbia Business School, you should ask for a very specific number—say, $64,750 rather than $65,000.

Turns out, when employees use a more precise number in their initial negotiation request, they are more likely to get a final offer closer to what they were hoping for. This is because the employer will assume you’ve done more extensive research into your market value to reach that specific number.

6. Be Willing to Walk Away

When considering your numbers, you should also come up with a “walk away point”—a final offer that’s so low that you have to turn it down. This could be based on financial need, market value, or simply what you need to feel good about the salary you’re bringing home.

Walking away from an offer will never be easy, but it’s important to know when to do it—and powerful to be able to say “no.”

7. Make Sure You’re Ready

Before you ask for a raise, you’ll want to ask yourself a few questions.

Have you been at your job for a year? Have you taken on new responsibilities since you’ve been hired? Have you been exceeding expectations (rather than just meeting them)? The answer to all of these should be “yes.”

8. Plan the Right Timing

Turns out, timing is everything. Most people wait until performance review season to ask for a salary adjustment, but by that time, your boss has probably already decided what raises will be doled out to the team.

Instead? “Start talking to your boss about getting a raise three to four months in advance,” writer and former human resources professional Suzanne Lucas of EvilHRLady.org told LearnVest. “That’s when they decide the budget.”

9. Prepare a One-Sheet

Prepare a “brag sheet,” recommends Kathleen O’Malley of Babble. “It’s a one-page summary that shows exactly how awesome you are as an employee. List any accomplishments, awards, and customer or co-worker testimonials (“You saved me when you did XYZ!” emails definitely count as testimonials!) you’ve received since your last review. You want to demonstrate your value to your boss.”

10. Remember Practice Makes Perfect

Rehearse, rehearse, rehearse. Write down what you want to say, and practice to a mirror, on video, or with a friend until you’re super comfortable having the conversation.

11. Set the Meeting for Thursday

Studies show that you’re more likely to get a raise if you ask on Thursday.

“As hard-line behavior disappears, we become more flexible and accommodating. Thursdays and Fridays find us most open to negotiation and compromise because we want to finish our work before the week is out,” reports Psychology Today.

12. Power Up

Before you go into the negotiation, try Amy Cuddy’s tip of doing a “power pose”—in other words, going into the bathroom and standing tall with your hands on your hips, your chin and chest raised proud, and your feet firm on the ground. Doing so raises testosterone, which influences confidence and reduces the stress hormone cortisol.

13. Drink Some Coffee

A study by the European Journal of Social Psychology found that caffeine made people more resistant to persuasion, meaning you’ll have an easier time holding your ground during the negotiation, reports Business Insider.

14. Walk in With Confidence

“The way you enter a room can dictate how the rest of an interaction will be,” reports James Clear. “Ever see someone slump through a doorway with a scowl on their face? Not very inspiring. Keep your head high and smile when you enter. Starting things off with a positive vibe is very important, no matter how small it is.”

15. Start With Questions

You should start the negotiation conversation by asking diagnostic questions to understand more about the other party’s true needs, desires, fears, preferences, and priorities. Professor Leigh Thompson at the Kellogg School of Business at Northwestern University says that 93% of all negotiators fail to ask these “diagnostic questions” in circumstances where getting them answered would significantly improve the outcome of negotiations.

Asking questions like, “What are your biggest priorities right now?” can help you understand where your negotiation partner is coming from—and offer up solutions that will help.

16. Show What You Can Do

Before you start talking numbers, talk about what you’ve done and—more importantly—what you can do.

Remember that brag sheet? Now’s your chance to walk through your accomplishments with your manager. If possible, print a copy for your manager to look at while you summarize what you’ve achieved this year. You’ll want to specifically highlight times when you’ve gone above and beyond in your role, which will build the case that you deserve a raise. Then, be prepared with a few thoughts on what you’re excited to take on going forward—whether that’s freeing up some of your manager’s bandwidth by taking on an existing project, or proposing a new idea that you’re excited to own.

17. Focus on the Future, Not the Past

When negotiating the salary for a new job, it’s not uncommon for the company (or even a recruiter during the job search process!) to ask about your current salary.

It can be a tricky situation, especially if you’re being underpaid at your current job or looking to make significantly more, but it’s never a good idea to lie.

Instead, give your current number (including benefits, bonuses, and the like) and then quickly move the conversation along to explain the number you’re looking for, focusing on explaining your new skills or responsibilities, your market value, and how you’re looking to grow, explains Pynchon.

18. Think About the Other Person

When preparing for negotiating, get in the mindset of thinking about the situation from your opponent’s perspective, recommends career expert Steph Stern. Research by Columbia psychologist Adam Galinsky shows that when we consider the other person’s thoughts and interests, we are more likely to find solutions that work well for both of us.

19. Try Thinking About Someone Else

Research from Columbia Business School shows that people—especially women—tend to do better when they negotiate for someone else, reports Stern.

“So, in preparing to negotiate, think about how what you’re asking for will impact those around you: It’s not just for you, but also for your family and your future. It’s even for your employer! After all, if you are happier with your position and compensation, you’re more likely to work hard and be successful.”

20. Stay Positive, Not Pushy

Negotiation may be scary, but you should always keep the conversation on a positive note, recommends Forbes. “[Kick] off the conversation with something like, ‘I really enjoy working here and find my projects very challenging. In the last year, I’ve been feeling that the scope of my work has expanded quite a bit. I believe my roles and responsibilities, and my contributions have risen. I’d like to discuss with you the possibilities of reviewing my compensation.’”

21. Put Your Number Out First

The anchor—or the first number put on the table—is the most important in negotiation, since it’s what the rest of the conversation is based off of. If it’s too low, you’ll end up with a lower final offer than you probably want.

You should always be the first person to mention a number so that you, not your counterpart, controls the anchor.

22. Ask for More Than What You Want

You should always ask for more than you actually want. Psychology shows that your bargaining partner will feel like he or she is getting a better deal if he or she negotiates down from your original ask.

And don’t fear asking for too much! The worst that can happen if you give a high number is that the other party will counteroffer—but the worst that can happen if you don’t negotiate is that you’ll get nothing.

23. Don’t Use a Range

Mike Hoffman suggests that you should never use the word “between” when negotiating.

In other words, never give a range: “I’m looking for between $60K and $65K.” That suggests you’re willing to concede, and the person you’re negotiating with will immediately jump to the smaller number.

24. Be Kind But Firm

Negotiating for a new job? Here’s a great script to try, courtesy of Rebecca Thorman at U.S. News & World Report:

“I’m really excited to work here, and I know that I will bring a lot of value. I appreciate the offer at $58,000, but was really expecting to be in the $65,000 range based on my experience, drive, and performance. Can we look at a salary of $65,000 for this position?”

25. Focus on Market Value

Rather than discussing a raise or new salary based on what you make now, keep the conversation focused on what the market is paying for people like you (your “market value”). Re-frame any metric your negotiation partner uses—like percentage differences—as market value, re-focusing the discussion on hard dollars.

26. Prioritize Your Requests

As part of your conversation, lay everything you’re looking for out on the table in rank order.

Explains Wharton professor Adam Grant on Business Insider: “In a job offer negotiation, for example, you might say that salary is most important to you, followed by location, and then vacation time and signing bonus. Research shows that rank-ordering is a powerful way to help your counterparts understand your interests without giving away too much information. You can then ask them to share their priorities, and look for opportunities for mutually beneficial tradeoffs: both sides win on the issues that are most important to them.”

27. But Don’t Mention Personal Needs

Don’t focus on your personal needs—like that fact that your rent’s gone up or childcare expenses have increased. (Chances are, your co-workers are dealing with similar situations.) You make a much better case to your boss (and his or her boss!) that you’re worth more when you focus on your performance and achievements.

28. Ask for Advice

After you’ve sold your benefits, talked about your value, and made your ask, Grant recommends asking, “I trust you, and I’d very much value your recommendations. What would you suggest?” By doing so, he says, you’ve flattered your negotiating partner, you’ve encouraged him or her to take your perspective, and you’ll (hopefully) persuade him or her to advocate for you and your request.

29. Use Email Where Appropriate

Most negotiations are done in person or over the phone, but if most of your communication with a recruiter or hiring manager has been over email, don’t be afraid to negotiate over email, as well. It ensures you stick to the script and can be a whole lot less scary.

If you do negotiate over email, try to infuse as much empathy, pleasant conversation, and openness as possible into your message, mimicking a real-life conversation. (Here’s how to do it, courtesy of Pynchon.)

30. Don’t Forget to Listen

Listening to the other party during a negotiation is almost as important as your ask and argument. By really paying attention to what the other person is saying, you can understand his or her needs and incorporate them into finding a solution that makes you both happy.

31. Don’t Fear the “No”

You may be afraid of rejection, but according to Pynchon, a negotiation doesn’t actually start until someone says “no.”

She explains: “It’s not really a negotiation if we’re asking for something we know our bargaining partner also wants. Negotiation is a conversation whose goal is to reach an agreement with someone whose interests are not perfectly aligned with yours.”

So understand that the “no” is just part of the process—not a statement on how you’re doing.

32. Use Stalling to Your Advantage

“When you hear the other person’s first offer, don’t say ‘OK.’ Say ‘Hmmm,’” recommends executive career coach Jack Chapman. “Give yourself some time, and in the seconds of silence, the other person is more likely to improve in some way.”

33. Ask Questions

Does the person you’re negotiating with flinch or otherwise react negatively to the number you put on the table? Don’t let that deter you; instead, ask open-ended questions to keep the conversation moving and show you’re willing to work together.

Pynchon suggests things like: “Seems like that took you by surprise. Tell me more…”; “What is the budget for this position based on?” or; “How can I help you move more in my direction?”

34. Don’t Be Afraid to Counter

If you ask for a higher salary and the employer says no? Doesn’t mean the conversation’s over.

Try this, says Thorman: “I understand where you’re coming from, and just want to reiterate my enthusiasm for the position and working with you and the team. I think my skills are perfectly suited for this position, and are worth $65,000.”

35. But Don’t Make Threats

Again, you ideally want to work (or keep working) with this person, so it’s important to keep the conversation positive. “Whatever you do, don’t threaten to leave if you don’t get the raise,” Smith reports. “You also shouldn’t threaten your boss with other job offers, interviews, [or] recruiter conversations.”

36. Consider Other Options

If your boss (or the hiring manager) really, really won’t budge? Try negotiating for flex time, more vacation time, a better title, or plum projects and assignments.

Here’s how to ask for each, courtesy of LearnVest.

37. Keep Negotiating

If this seems like a lot—well, unfortunately, it is. Negotiation is a complicated process with volumes of books on techniques, tactics, and scripts.

The good news? The more you do it, the easier it becomes. Even better, the more money you’ll bring home! So, get out there and start negotiating. You’ve now got the skills to do it right.

 

https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-negotiate-salary-37-tips-you-need-to-know

ARE YOU IN NEED OF TOP TALENT NOW? Don’t have the time to spend nor available bandwidth to look for your company’s perfect match? Does this leave you with projects undone, unable to launch new initiatives or deliver desired output, let alone to grow your profits? Is your hiring process stalled and limping along with unfilled requisitions? Discover the ease and satisfaction of partnering with experts whose ONLY mission is to accomplish laser-focused search and to acquire top-tier skill on your behalf, each and every day! Contact us at 415-234-0707  or email at connect@superiansources.com Find out what a customized service SAVES you in TIME, MONEY and RESOURCES!

ARE YOU TODAY’S TOP TALENT LOOKING FOR A NEW ROLE? Do you want assurance that you are represented by the best and have opportunities open to you within exceptional workplaces? Have you heard that being presented by a boutique search firm is the edge you need to get in the door and have your opportunity to shine? Contact us at 415-234-0707 or email at  connect@superiansources.com – http://www.SuperianSources.com

 

 

Refer a Friend:

Refer a friend to Superian Sources for employment opportunities.

Once they are hired through our service, you receive a $100 gift card.

Refer a business and receive a $200 gift card for the first hire.  Call or email Superian for details.

How to Save Yourself When Everyone Else in Your Office Is Getting Sick

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Un-fun fact for you: This year’s terrible flu season is far from over. While most sources say that this year is no more unusual than in the past, we’re all still a little paranoid (especially when we read news articles like this one).

Plus, no one likes being sick. Sure, you get to stay home for a few days, but the trade-off is feeling like death. Personally, I’d rather attend six meetings in a row than experience the worst of the flu (and I hate meetings).

So how can you keep yourself healthy when everyone around you is dropping like flies? These tips will help, courtesy of expert Dr. David Reitman, MD, Medical Director at the American University Student Health Center.

Get Your Shot (Really, It’s Not Too Late)

“People who are getting influenza have much milder cases if they have partial protection from the flu vaccine,” says Reitman. “Also, there are three other strains in this year’s vaccine that can still make an appearance over the next three months. Even though it takes about two weeks for the vaccine to confer protection, it’s not too late to get one!”

And it’s free if you have insurance! You can stop by any drug store, urgent care center, or even Walmart for two minutes and you’ll be that much more protected.

Make Lysol Your Best Friend

And hand sanitizer. And soap.

“Alcohol hand sanitizers like Purell are actually excellent at killing influenza, although they’re not as effective in killing norovirus (the stomach virus which is also going around right now). Hand washing before eating and after using the bathroom is again very important,” says Reitman.

Also, keep your hands off your face as much as possible—meaning avoid biting your nails or rubbing your eyes unless you’ve cleaned your hands first. “The flu is spread through respiratory particles but frequently these particles end up on surfaces. Once the flu viruses go from the hands to the mouth, nose, or eyes, you’re infected,” he adds.

Encourage People to Go Home (if You Can)

If you see a sick co-worker and work in an office in which people are encouraged to take sick days or work-from-home when they’re under the weather, say something. Just make sure to say it nicely (and in a one-on-one setting)—“Hey, I hate to be that person, but if you think you’re getting sick I highly recommend you go home so it doesn’t spread to the rest of us. I’m happy to take over if there’s something you’re working on so you don’t feel like you’re adding to our plates.”

This especially goes for managers. Your direct reports may feel uncomfortable asking for time off, so encourage them to go home if they’re not feeling well—even if they don’t think they have the flu.

Find an Alternate Workspace

Co-worker’s coughing up a lung next to you? Try moving to another desk or a conference room to work in peace. At the very least, avoid using other people’s devices or sharing office supplies for the time being. Yep, that means carrying around your own dry-erase markers (over the top? Sure. Safer? Definitely).

Try to Negotiate a WFH Day

This might be trickier to do, but if you work for a company that’s a little more flexible about working remotely, and everyone on your team’s coming down with something, consider talking to your boss or HR about working from home. Remind them that you’ll be much more valuable if you stay away than if you come in and have to take several days off later because you got sick.

Go Into Urgent Care Mode as Soon as You Feel Sick

As soon as your nose starts getting stuffy or your head starts aching, take action. Work from home (you don’t want to be the person everyone avoids in the office), stay hydrated (not just Gatorade or orange juice but water, too), get enough sleep, and stock up on any supplies you need like tissues or medication so you don’t have to travel far from your bed later. Doing something sooner means you’ll recover sooner.

Finally, take care of yourself. Eat healthy, get a decent amount of sleep, exercise moderately, and avoid stress if you can (or, at least find ways to destress). The more you put yourself in a good place now, the more likely your body and mind will be strong enough to fend off illness.

 

https://www.themuse.com/advice/prevent-getting-sick-at-work-when-everyone-else-office-sick-flu

ARE YOU IN NEED OF TOP TALENT NOW? Don’t have the time to spend nor available bandwidth to look for your company’s perfect match? Does this leave you with projects undone, unable to launch new initiatives or deliver desired output, let alone to grow your profits? Is your hiring process stalled and limping along with unfilled requisitions? Discover the ease and satisfaction of partnering with experts whose ONLY mission is to accomplish laser-focused search and to acquire top-tier skill on your behalf, each and every day! Contact us at 415-234-0707  or email at connect@superiansources.com Find out what a customized service SAVES you in TIME, MONEY and RESOURCES!

ARE YOU TODAY’S TOP TALENT LOOKING FOR A NEW ROLE? Do you want assurance that you are represented by the best and have opportunities open to you within exceptional workplaces? Have you heard that being presented by a boutique search firm is the edge you need to get in the door and have your opportunity to shine? Contact us at 415-234-0707 or email at  connect@superiansources.com – http://www.SuperianSources.com

 

 

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Refer a friend to Superian Sources for employment opportunities.

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The Ultimate Interview Guide: 30 Prep Tips for Job Interview Success

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Preparing for an interview takes a lot more than Googling a list of common interview questions. You have to make a great first impression appearance-wise (no wrinkly suits here!), have a great knowledge of your target company and its product, and, of course, know exactly how to convey that you’re the perfect fit for the job.

So to help you get prepared, we compiled a list of our all-time best pre-interview tips. From strategizing about how to tackle the toughest questions to packing your briefcase, we’ve got you covered—with 30 ways to make sure you bring your A-game.

  1. Spend a few hours learning everything you can about the company—from as many sources as you can. Talk to friends and contacts, read current news releases, and, yes, spend some time on Google. Often, candidates just look at the information a company is pushing out via the website and social media, but fail to look more in depth at what others are saying. By doing so, you’ll get the larger picture about the company (along with any negative press).
  2. Get a sense of “who” the company is and how to embody a similar personality during your interview. Start by reading the company’s blog and Facebook page—the tone of the company’s content on these sites will speak volumes. Or, try reading individual employees’ blogs to figure out what type of people work (and excel) there.
  3. Twitter can also be an excellent resource because you can see what the company and its employees are talking about. Are they sarcastically bantering with each other? Feel free to throw a few jokes in as you’re meeting with people. Are they tweeting up a storm about an event or product launch? Use it as a conversation starter.
  4. No matter what role you’re interviewing for—engineering, sales, marketing—you should always use the product before your first interview (and ideally, a few times). If hired, your goal will be to create value for the people who use that product, and being a user yourself is the first step.
  5. Check out Glassdoor for company reviews from current and previous employees—but take them as a guide, not fact.
  6. Before your interview, get a list of the people you’re meeting with from the company. Then, learn more about them—including what type of behavior might intrigue them or turn them off. Finally, prep some questions that are specific to each interviewer: Ask for details about her focus at the firm, discuss current events on his specialty, or bring up a common interest you know he or she has outside the office.
  7. Different firms use different types of interviews, so ask what you’ll be faced with. For example, some companies will ask case questions or brain teasers while others will give a standard set of typical interview and leadership questions. Asking the recruiter or HR contact about the interview format ahead of time is totally fair game. And once you know, investing time to become familiar with this style can make a huge difference.

  1. Even if you’re a well-oiled interviewing machine, it’s essential to spend time thinking carefully about what skills, accomplishments, and interview answers will resonate with your interviewers most. Your management abilities? Your creativity? The examples you share will probably be slightly different everywhere you interview.
  2. Have an answer to “tell me about yourself” ready to go. Interviewers always ask it, and you want to be sure to nail this first part of the interview.
  3. Don’t be thrown off by the classic, “What’s your biggest weakness?” One foolproof method: Think of something that you struggle with but that you’re working to improve. For example, maybe you’ve never been strong at public speaking, but over the past few years, you’ve taken on leadership roles and volunteered to run meetings to help you be more comfortable when addressing a crowd.
  4. You can easily find lists of common interview questions—but don’t prepare by writing out your entire answer; instead, jot down a few notes or bullet points and keep them on hand for the interview itself. You’ll ensure you cover the bases—without reading from a script.
  5. Don’t forget about the numbers! Finding some numbers, percentages, increases, or quotas you can use when talking about your responsibilities and accomplishments really sweetens the deal and helps you tell a hiring manager why you’re so awesome.
  6. It’s likely you’ll get asked why you’re interested in this particular role and company. (And if you can’t answer this question, you shouldn’t be in the interview!) So to make sure you can, consider why you’re interested in the function and identify a couple of key factors that make it a great fit for you (e.g., I love customer support because I love the constant human interaction and the satisfaction that comes from helping someone solve a problem”).
  7. Don’t just think about how you’ll answer certain questions; practice looking in the mirror and answering them out loud. This prep work will help you clarify your thoughts and make you much more comfortable during the interview.
  8. Do as many mock interviews as you possibly can with a friend. You’ll be much better at answering, “What would you bring to the position?” the 100th time you do it than the first, right?
  9. Prepare a few smart questions for when it’s your turn to ask. Make sure they’re thoughtful ones that show you’ve been paying attention and have done your homework when it comes to researching the company and the specific job you’re after.

 

  1. Plan the perfect interview outfit. For companies that have a business or business casual dress code keep your look basic and conservative for the first interview. Not sure what to wear? If you have a contact or friend who works at the company you’re interviewing with, see if he or she can give you a heads up as to what people wear. If you don’t have that luxury, hang out at a coffee shop across the street a day or two before, and try to get a glimpse at what people are wearing.
  2. Make sure you get your outfit cleaned, pressed, and tailored (a modern fit is best). People often have their “interviewing suit” that’s been sitting in their closet for the past couple of years, and they dust it off for the occasion—you don’t want to be that guy or girl.
  3. Don’t forget about the little things: Shine your shoes, check for loose hems, and make sure your fingernails look manicured. This is the stuff that you don’t always think people notice, but they do!
  4. Do a little pampering, because looking your best helps you feel your best. If that means you need a facial, haircut, razor shave, or even a new interview outfit, then by all means do it! Feeling good about yourself will boost your confidence—and we probably don’t have to tell you that confidence is key to landing your dream job.
  5. Print out five copies of your resume. You never know who you’ll be meeting with, and you want to have your resume ready to go in case you’re asked for it.
  6. Prepare a reference list, whether you think you’ll be asked for it or not. For each reference, include a name, title, organization, division or department, telephone number, and email address, as well as a sentence briefly explaining the relationship (e.g., “Carlton was my team leader for two years, during which we collaborated on four major product launches”).
  7. Prep a go-to interview kit for your purse or briefcase. It should be large enough to hold your everyday essentials, plus your interview musts, such as extra resumes and a notepad, as well as a special emergency kit stocked with what you might need in an unexpected situation (think: Band-Aids, a stain stick, an umbrella, and breath mints).
  8. Clean out your bag! If you have to dig past candy wrappers, phone chargers, and old receipts to get that resume, you’re going to look a little unorganized. Everything you need should be neatly organized and readily accessible. The less you have to rifle through your bag, the better.

 

  1. Spend the most time before the interview not rehearsing questions, but reflecting on your career chronology to date. When you know your story inside and out, it’s much easier to apply examples to just about any interview question.
  2. Getting ready for a technical interview? Start preparing as early as possible. Working through a prep book or sample questions will not only give you good practice, but it’ll also put you in the right problem-solving mindset.
  3. Come up with a go-to phrase that’ll help you avoid dead air if you need time to stall and gather your thoughts. Two strategies that work well are repeating the question thoughtfully before answering or saying (slowly), “Now, that is a great question. I think I would have to say….”
  4. Brush up on what certain body language conveys. Be aware of what you’re communicating through your posture and stance—and make sure it’s good. (For example, sitting with your arms and legs crossed sends a message that you are closed-off or feel defensive.) Think your movements through ahead of time so you are not distracted (or distracting) during the interview.
  5. Use an interview cheat sheet to compile all the details you need to remember, jot down notes about what you want to say and ask, and check off all the essentials you need to bring. Print one out for every interview, read it over the morning of, and you’ll be good to go!(We made one for you, just click on the graphic below!)
  6. Oh, and get some sleep. This sounds like something your mom would tell you, but there are few things that will throw you off your game like sleep deprivation.

    ARE YOU IN NEED OF TOP TALENT NOW? Don’t have the time to spend nor available bandwidth to look for your company’s perfect match? Does this leave you with projects undone, unable to launch new initiatives or deliver desired output, let alone to grow your profits? Is your hiring process stalled and limping along with unfilled requisitions? Discover the ease and satisfaction of partnering with experts whose ONLY mission is to accomplish laser-focused search and to acquire top-tier skill on your behalf, each and every day! Contact us at 415-234-0707  or email at connect@superiansources.com Find out what a customized service SAVES you in TIME, MONEY and RESOURCES!

    ARE YOU TODAY’S TOP TALENT LOOKING FOR A NEW ROLE? Do you want assurance that you are represented by the best and have opportunities open to you within exceptional workplaces? Have you heard that being presented by a boutique search firm is the edge you need to get in the door and have your opportunity to shine? Contact us at 415-234-0707 or email at  connect@superiansources.com – http://www.SuperianSources.com

     

     

    Refer a Friend:

    Refer a friend to Superian Sources for employment opportunities.

    Once they are hired through our service, you receive a $100 gift card.

    Refer a business and receive a $200 gift card for the first hire.  Call or email Superian for details