8 Confidence-Boosting Habits You Should Adopt ASAP

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We all know confidence is a big factor of success—it’s the determinant of achievement, the drive that keeps you going. But we don’t always have as much it on hand as we need.

Most people will tell you to “fake it ’til you make it” when it comes to feeling good about yourself. But I’m not a big believer in that. I don’t think you have to fake anything, because you already have within you what you need. You just have to discover the qualities that make you feel important by connecting you with those inner resources, and lead from within.

Here are eight ways to restore your self-assurance daily:

1. Go Out of Your Way to Get Out of Your Comfort Zone

Confidence comes from taking risks. When you take a chance and get positive results, it proves you’re capable. Wins turn into empowerment. Don’t let the fear of discomfort and failure make you frightened to try—be bold and take the risks you need to be successful.

2. Adopt a Positive Outlook and a Noble Cause

Spend as much time as you need to find the good in life. Consider what’s meaningful, and think about what you want to achieve and how you’re going to achieve it. Look for things that inspire and motivate you. Most of all, adopt a positive outlook and stay connected to a noble cause. Confidence soars when you embark on a mission with an honorable purpose—and if you look around, you’ll realize that those among us who live purposefully and seek out ways to serve others are the most content.

3. Get Up One More Time Than You’ve Fallen

You demonstrate confidence every time you fall down and have the tenacity to get back up—from knowing how to learn from problems and mistakes, let them go, and move on, whether it happens once or a hundred times.

4. Become as Well-Informed as You Can

School yourself on current events and general information—make a point of filling whatever gaps exist in your knowledge so you can build a broad perspective. Being knowledgeable gives you the confidence to contribute meaningfully to conversations and planning.

5. Don’t Let Perfectionism Stop You From Trying

Perfection is the enemy of success. When you feel you have to be perfect, it’s easy to become locked up with enough fear that you don’t even try. Instead, satisfy yourself by doing your best work and having confidence in its value.

6. Look the Part

Make subtle changes to empower yourself through the way you dress, your body language, and even in the way you speak. Taking small steps toward displaying your confidence can help you strengthen it. That doesn’t mean trying to be something you’re not, but showing others your own unique and talented self.

7. Trust Your Instincts and Go With Your Gut

You know more than you think, so learn to trust the inner voice that says, “You can do this.” When that trust is absent, the resulting void keeps you from achieving all that you’re capable of. Trust yourself and you’ll know how to succeed.

8. Don’t Let the Past Dictate Your Future

Your level of assurance is set in part by how you’ve dealt with past struggles. Much of the difference between those who are confident and those who are not lies in how they carry their past. Learn from struggle and make it part of you, and then move forward believing that you are credible, smart, and worthy of success. Show the same compassion to yourself as you do to others.

If you can stretch yourself to cultivate positivity, tenacity, and trust in yourself, you will find a deep well of confidence to lead you in whatever you choose to undertake.

 

https://www.themuse.com/advice/8-confidenceboosting-habits-you-should-adopt-asap

 

ARE YOU IN NEED OF TOP TALENT NOW? Don’t have the time to spend nor available bandwidth to look for your company’s perfect match? Does this leave you with projects undone, unable to launch new initiatives or deliver desired output, let alone to grow your profits? Is your hiring process stalled and limping along with unfilled requisitions? Discover the ease and satisfaction of partnering with experts whose ONLY mission is to accomplish laser-focused search and to acquire top-tier skill on your behalf, each and every day! Contact us at 415-234-0707 ext. 5 or email at connect@superiansources.com Find out what a customized service SAVES you in TIME, MONEY and RESOURCES!

 

ARE YOU TODAY’S TOP TALENT LOOKING FOR A NEW ROLE? Do you want assurance that you are represented by the best and have opportunities open to you within exceptional workplaces? Have you heard that being presented by a boutique search firm is the edge you need to get in the door and have your opportunity to shine? Contact us at 415-234-0707 or email at connect@superiansources.com – http://www.SuperianSources.com

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Do Good Bosses Give People a Heads-up When Bad News Is About to Break?

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Here’s a classic leadership scenario: You’re a boss and you’ve been told about big changes that are going to happen in your organization. Some people are going to be reassigned, others are going to lose their jobs or be offered lesser positions. Here’s the kicker: You can’t say anything about it. The information is confidential.

But you’re the kind of boss who has built a lot of street cred for being transparent. And it’s going to come out that you knew about the changes beforehand.

The best managers don’t build loyalty and trust by secretly sharing confidential company information or telling employees bad news that isn’t their business; instead they do it by sharing what needs to be shared, maintaining confidentiality, and being truthful in how and what they communicate. (Remember that saying “I can’t talk about that” or “I am not at liberty to discuss that” isn’t a personal rejection, it’s an honest, professional statement of truth.)

Give your employees the credit to understand. For example, you—and they—know it’d be wrong to say something negative about one employee to another, and expect him to keep secrets from his teammates. Following the same logic, being open about “almost” everything also doesn’t include breaking the trust you have established with your boss by sharing something she’s told you to keep quiet about.

Yet, I know that’s easier said than done. So, here’s how to support your team without sharing something inappropriate:

1. When You Disagree With a Practice Inside the Organization

Show your integrity by telling the truth about your disagreement—especially to your boss—but still abiding by the policy. Here’s a real-life example: Kim-Ly was a shift supervisor at a clinic that instituted a policy preventing the use of mobile phones for nurses when they were working a shift. The nurses (men and women who had infants and school-aged children) needed to be accessible to their kids’ schools and childcare during work hours. Others had family or personal situations that occasionally cropped up that were important to handle during work hours.

Kim-Ly disagreed with the policy and shared with her employees that she was working hard to get management to change it. But until they did, she expected her team to stick to it. Supporting the policy while disagreeing with it eventually led to a new solution; a common “24/7” cell phone and mobile device that was managed and used collectively by everyone on the shift. The clinic’s management team liked the solution so much they implemented it as the standard throughout the organization, and Kim-Ly and her team were credited with the solution.

2. When Layoffs Are Coming and Your Team Has No Idea

You have strong relationships with you team, and so you know Dan is looking to buy a house and Tina’s daughter will be starting college soon. You’re wracked with guilt because you know that by the end of the year, one of them will need to find a new job.

More than a few bosses resort to secretly warning employees like Dan and Tina to not make any big financial decisions for a few weeks. Even though it’s done with the best of intentions, this sort of disclosure is breaking confidentiality and is likely to backfire. For most people, it’s just too hard to sit on a secret about job security. But as hard as it is, do your best to maintain confidentiality.

Your only hope for preventing this sort of unpleasant surprise is to always keep employees up-to-to date on the overall performance of the organization and remind them that everyone’s job is tied to that performance. For example, make reviewing the business results of your team or group a regular part of meetings. Doing so lowers the risk of people being caught by surprise, whatever the situation.

Once the news is out in the open, be ready to listen to them talk about their fears and concerns. Do your best to put yourself in their shoes and show empathy, then be ready to offer support if they ask for it—from writing reference letters to helping them think through finding a job that fits their talents in the future.

3. When There Will Be a Big Change (That Doesn’t Directly Affect Them)

No one has to fear for his or her jobs, but the landscape is changing. Maybe the CEO is leaving; there will be a merger; another office is shutting down; or some interpersonal scandal is about to come out. This can still make people feel unsettled and nervous.

After the news comes out, if someone asks you “Did you know about this?” Tell the truth. Respond with something like “Yes, it felt awkward to not tell you about it, but it wasn’t my place to share the information.” Situations like this can become teachable moments for your employees about what professionalism and maintaining confidentiality looks like.

Don’t wait for a crisis to tell your employees where your loyalties and responsibilities lie. Regular, open communication is what’s needed to maintain people’s trust and confidence.

Make sure your employees know your motivations. As their leader, you support their careers and advancement. But at the same time, as long as it’s legal and ethical, you are obliged to support your employer’s plans; its part of what they’re paying you to do. It can be a tough balance for sure, but being open—within reason—is the right place to start.

https://www.themuse.com/advice/do-good-bosses-give-people-a-headsup-when-bad-news-is-about-to-break

ARE YOU IN NEED OF TOP TALENT NOW? Don’t have the time to spend nor available bandwidth to look for your company’s perfect match? Does this leave you with projects undone, unable to launch new initiatives or deliver desired output, let alone to grow your profits? Is your hiring process stalled and limping along with unfilled requisitions? Discover the ease and satisfaction of partnering with experts whose ONLY mission is to accomplish laser-focused search and to acquire top-tier skill on your behalf, each and every day! Contact us at 415-234-0707 ext. 5 or email at connect@superiansources.com Find out what a customized service SAVES you in TIME, MONEY and RESOURCES!

 

ARE YOU TODAY’S TOP TALENT LOOKING FOR A NEW ROLE? Do you want assurance that you are represented by the best and have opportunities open to you within exceptional workplaces? Have you heard that being presented by a boutique search firm is the edge you need to get in the door and have your opportunity to shine? Contact us at 415-234-0707 or email at connect@superiansources.com – http://www.SuperianSources.com

4 Rules the Most Successful Leaders Live By

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The old adage states that rules are meant to be broken. And, in fact, many of today’s most revered leaders echo this time-tested mantra: Sir Richard Branson once uttered the sage advice, “You don’t learn to walk by following rules. You learn by doing, and by falling over.”

But while the rule-breaking approach certainly lends itself to disruptive ideas, innovative thinking, and challenging the status quo, don’t let the bravado fool you: Leaders do follow rules—just not always the rules taught in Management 101.

Below are a few out-of-the-box guidelines that some of the most famous leaders in recent history swear by—and how you can incorporate them into your own life.

Rule #1: Don’t Waste Brain Power on Trivialities

When it comes to leadership style in the most literal sense, Mark Zuckerberg is famous for his, let’s call it, “dorm room chic” fashion choices. His grey hoodie is an inextricable part of his public persona. Steve Jobs is another iconic figure who’s famous for a signature ensemble: Even Jobs’ LEGO character dons the black turtleneck.

There’s a well-documented reason why some successful leaders wear the same thing every day, and it’s not because they’re making a thinly veiled statement about corporate fashion: It’s to avoid decision fatigue, or the mental paralysis that results from information overload. The theory posits that your brain has a limited amount of decision-making power, so using it for trivial things—like your daily outfit or how to cook your eggs in the morning—is ultimately wasteful of a finite resource.

While we’re not advocating tossing out every wardrobe item that’s not on the grey scale, there is a valuable takeaway here: Prioritizing decisions is a crucial element of successful leadership. Look for opportunities in your own life to cut out or delegate choices that you don’t need to make—it can be key for reducing decision fatigue and freeing up extra brain space for matters that matter.

Rule #2: Fail, Fail Again

Growth through failure is one of the most prevalent themes touted by modern leaders.

James Dyson, for example, famously tested 5,127 prototypes of his revolutionary vacuum cleaner before releasing the version that finally went to market. Airbnb faced numerous VC rejections before finally successfully securing funding. Google Glass was probably one of the most famous failures out there.

I could go on and on. If you think about it (or do a little research), you’ll find that nearly every notable company has experienced spectacular failure at some point on the way. That’s because if you’re taking the risks required to do big things, things are bound to not work out as planned from time to time. Or, as author and speaker Ken Robinson says, “If you’re not prepared to be wrong, you’ll never come up with anything original.”

So how can you use failure to propel you forward like the great leaders of our time, rather than letting it get you down? In their book The Other “F” Word: How Smart Leaders, Teams, and Entrepreneurs Put Failure to WorkJohn Danner and Mark Coopersmith suggest this: Expect that disasters will happen and plan for the worst of them ahead of time; aim to recognize failure early and respond as it’s happening; and if everything falls apart, analyze what went wrong and put those lessons into everything you do moving forward. And, we’d add, make sure you take care of yourself along the way and surround yourself with colleagues and comrades you’re certain will have your back in a slump.


 


Rule #3: Always Ask for Criticism

On the path to successful leadership, feedback walks right next to failure. Not only is it important to “never stop iterating,” but it’s also crucial to seek honest feedback from consumers, colleagues, and your own team members.

In a 2013 TED talk, Elon Musk advised about the importance of seeking negative feedback, particularly from those closest to you and your business. “Really pay attention to negative feedback, and solicit it, particularly from friends,” he says. “This may sound like simple advice, but hardly anyone does that, and it’s incredibly helpful.” Bill Gates backs him up, suggesting leaders pay close attention to any negative points of feedback from users or customers: “Your most unhappy customers are your greatest source of learning,” he once famously advised. We’d note that this also applies to unhappy teammates, bosses, or anyone else you work closely with.

While it’s never fun to face your shortcomings, it’s important to take them seriously (but not personally) if you want to move forward. First things first, figure how much of the feedback is a fact or an opinion. While both may be worth addressing, this simple distinction is important. If need be, ask more questions of the person giving you feedback to really try to understand the crux of the problem. Then, start creating a plan to solve it, working with a trusted friend or advisor if you need some help understanding how to move forward.

And, of course, make sure to also remind yourself what you’re doing well along the way, to help keep your spirits up!

Rule #4: Have Confidence to Ask for What You Need

People often think successful leaders have gotten to the top by throwing themselves into their work, sacrificing their life for long hours at the office, and always being available. And while, yes, for some this is true, more often leaders are able to succeed because they are thoughtful about what they need to make all aspects of their lives work—and aren’t afraid to ask for it.

Sheryl Sandberg is one of the most famous proponents of this rule, and one of the disciples of Sandberg’s philosophy is Stacy Brown-Philpot, CEO of TaskRabbit. Brown-Philpot’s list of accomplishments is lengthy; her resume includes names like Goldman Sachs and Google, and she’s the founder of the Black Googler Network, a cornerstone of the company’s revamped diversity efforts. But, in her Lean In story, she shares that some of her successful decisions came not because she threw her life to the side, but because she figured out what she would need to balance everything. “Never be afraid to ask for what you need to make your whole life—not just your work life—work for you,” she shares.

Asking for the things you need to maintain work-life balance, as well as asking for support from employees, colleagues, and trusted confidants is paramount for successful leaders to avoid burnout and, ultimately, be better at what they do.

So, if you think a weekly work-from-home day, the opportunity to leave the office a little earlier to pick up your kids, or something similar would make you a more balanced person and, in turn, a better professional, don’t be afraid to approach your boss and see if a flexible arrangement can be worked out.

Becoming a leader isn’t easy, but the good news is, those who’ve come before have left a playbook that’s worth paying attention to. Begin to follow these rules, and you’ll likely get closer to success than you ever imagined.

 

https://www.themuse.com/advice/4-rules-the-most-successful-leaders-live-by

 

ARE YOU IN NEED OF TOP TALENT NOW? Don’t have the time to spend nor available bandwidth to look for your company’s perfect match? Does this leave you with projects undone, unable to launch new initiatives or deliver desired output, let alone to grow your profits? Is your hiring process stalled and limping along with unfilled requisitions? Discover the ease and satisfaction of partnering with experts whose ONLY mission is to accomplish laser-focused search and to acquire top-tier skill on your behalf, each and every day! Contact us at 415-234-0707 ext. 5 or email at connect@superiansources.com Find out what a customized service SAVES you in TIME, MONEY and RESOURCES!

 

ARE YOU TODAY’S TOP TALENT LOOKING FOR A NEW ROLE? Do you want assurance that you are represented by the best and have opportunities open to you within exceptional workplaces? Have you heard that being presented by a boutique search firm is the edge you need to get in the door and have your opportunity to shine? Contact us at 415-234-0707 or email at connect@superiansources.com – http://www.SuperianSources.com

2 Key Questions to Ask Yourself if Your Interviews Aren’t Leading to Offers

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You’ve perfected your resume, polished your LinkedIn profile, and you’re getting interview after interview.

There’s only one problem: It stops there—every time. You’re not getting any job offers.

Before we get to the solution, take a moment to feel good about the fact that you’ve already overcome some of the biggest challenges: You know where you belong and recruiters agree that you’re in the right place. That takes time—and hard work—and you deserve to pat yourself on the back: Those good feelings will help you stay positive during a long search.

OK, now that you’ve celebrated coming this far, it’s time to get down to business, and fix what’s keeping you from getting an offer. Most often, it boils down to one of two things holding you back: what you’re saying or how you’re saying it.

1. Are You Giving the Right Answers?

The first place to look is the content of your answers. For example, are the stories you’re telling about your background and work experience compelling? Or do they come across as amateurish or irrelevant?

To find out, map out your most common answers (e.g., those with key themes like leadership, communication, conflict resolution) against these bullets:

  • What was the big challenge? My team was up against a major deadline and everyone was stressed out since it looked like we wouldn’t hit it.
  • How did you respond? Rather than let everyone burn out and hand in subpar work, I led an impromptu outing to a local kickboxing class. And once our team got our frustrations out, we came back to the office and worked together better and harder than we ever had!
  • What was the result? We not only finished our project ahead of time, but we also had 100% retention on that same team for the next two years.

Then, have a friend review your responses to make sure they’re clear (“I understand exactly what you did”) and compelling (“I understand exactly why it was important”). If she can’t explain what you accomplished or doesn’t get why it matters, you have your culprit: Your stories just aren’t up-to-snuff.

If that’s the case, go back to the drawing board and do one of two things:

If you love the example you chose, work on refining it. Strip away unnecessary detail (no one needs to know about all the weird team acronyms your last job used), add in context that you might take for granted (but they do need to understand why you were working with those teams in the first place), and try to clarify the result (even if the result was just better teamwork, was there a quantifiable outcome like “erased five weeks of deadlock”). Here’s a complete guide to transforming your stories into interviewer catnip.

But if you’re not 100% passionate about the answer, don’t be afraid to cut it. Even if a given project took months of your time to complete, it’s not necessarily going to translate into a great story if the accomplishment was shrouded in complexity and lacking a defined outcome. It’s better to choose one that’s easy to understand and has a clear result, even if wasn’t as big a part of your job.

2. Are You Saying Your Answers the Right Way?

But what if your friend tells you your examples are spot-on? If so, chances are it’s how you’re delivering them that’s holding you back. And here’s where you need to do some practice interviews.

You’ll need someone (who you can trust to be honest) to listen to you rehearse your responses. After you answer your mock interview questions, ask: Did I appear down to earth and come across positively? What did my body language say? Would you want to work with me?

As it turns out, hiring managers don’t just look for competence, they also look for warmth. Even if your stories demonstrate serious expertise, you also need to come across as an engaging human to get an offer.

If your friend isn’t getting this warmth from your responses, here are a few concrete things to practice:

Start by smiling as you answer. Psychological research has shown that the mere act of smiling, even when you’re feeling nervous, can change your mood. And it also becomes contagious to the listener, reframing the way they perceive you.

Consider building some self-deprecating moments into your stories. Think about how much people love seeing celebrities read mean tweets about themselves. There’s something innately likeable about people who can laugh at themselves. (It’s the surest way to get your interviewer laughing, too.)

Finally, use the Ben Franklin effect and ask your interviewer questions throughout. Contrary to what you might expect, asking someone for a favor doesn’t make them like you less: It actually makes them like you more! For example, “Now, I’m curious—how would your team have solved that challenge?”

If you’re getting interviews but not offers, just repeating the same mistakes over and over again is a recipe for heartache. Instead, find a friend who can provide an objective take on both your stories and your style.

And then, after you identify the issue and get your awesome new role, promise you’ll be there to help him prep during his job search.

https://www.themuse.com/advice/2-key-questions-to-ask-yourself-if-your-interviews-arent-leading-to-offers

 

ARE YOU IN NEED OF TOP TALENT NOW? Don’t have the time to spend nor available bandwidth to look for your company’s perfect match? Does this leave you with projects undone, unable to launch new initiatives or deliver desired output, let alone to grow your profits? Is your hiring process stalled and limping along with unfilled requisitions? Discover the ease and satisfaction of partnering with experts whose ONLY mission is to accomplish laser-focused search and to acquire top-tier skill on your behalf, each and every day! Contact us at 415-234-0707 ext. 5 or email at connect@superiansources.com Find out what a customized service SAVES you in TIME, MONEY and RESOURCES!

 

ARE YOU TODAY’S TOP TALENT LOOKING FOR A NEW ROLE? Do you want assurance that you are represented by the best and have opportunities open to you within exceptional workplaces? Have you heard that being presented by a boutique search firm is the edge you need to get in the door and have your opportunity to shine? Contact us at 415-234-0707 or email at connect@superiansources.com – http://www.SuperianSources.com

Your Experience Is No Longer Enough: 5 Resume Changes Executives Need to Make

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Oh, so you’re ready to take a run at the corner office, are you? Got a hankering to be large and in charge, the big kahuna, the literal CEO around your current or future organization?

All of that sounds right as rain. But how are you looking on paper? Is your current resume up to the task of proving your case? And, if not, what exactly do you need to do to bump up your paperwork so that, on paper, you appear to be an exceptional match?

Here are five things you should do right now if you are trying to land an extremely coveted executive role:

1. Introduce Yourself as an Executive

So many professionals use the “add on, add on, add on, and add on some more” approach when it comes to updating their resumes. The problem with this methodology is that, after a handful of add-ons, it very well begins to resemble a pieced-together Frankenstein at the exact career moment when you’re trying to resemble a put together executive.

When your goal is to land an executive role, you absolutely must introduce yourself as an executive, right out of the gates. The best place to achieve this is in a career summary at the top of the page before you launch into your career chronology. Construct three or four bullet points or statements that spell out your value proposition, with your specific audience in mind.

In other words, think about the things that are going to be important for you to be able to do in this next job—for instance: strategy, leadership, problem solving, delivering growth—and introduce yourself as someone equipped to do (and with demonstrated successes in) these key things.

2. Make your Strategy and Leadership Strengths Clear

Two vital skills that make for a great executive are an ability to build and then deploy strategies, and, proven strengths in motivating, leading and developing teams and individuals. Leaders must excel at leading. People at this level must excel at big-picture thinking.

Assuming this is you, then make it crystal clear in your resume. You don’t just “get” to become an executive because you’ve climbed up the ladder and this is the logical next bump up. In most companies today, it simply doesn’t work that way anymore. You’ve got to be able to perform at a higher, more strategic, and more inspiring level than most everyone else at the company.

Highlight these traits—including specific examples that prove them—on your new resume.

3. Show the Impact. Show the Impact. Show the Impact

This is no time to get stuck lingering on the duties and responsibilities you hold, or have held in prior positions. (Which, by the way, is the most common error people make in their resumes—showing only duties and responsibilities.) You need to show impact. Where did you help the organization make money, save money, salvage situations, solve problems, capitalize on opportunities, build something entirely new?

Show all that. And show the specific results—even if qualitative or anecdotal—of each of these things as you spell out how and why you’re a great fit.

4. Ease Off the Gas on the Nitty-Gritty Technical Skills

If you’re a CIO, it’s probably great that you know C#, Java, SQL, and Perl. But if you go too heavy on your technical skills and not heavy enough on the stuff that makes for a great leader—business acumen, ability to strategize, inspire others and execute—you will risk looking more like “middle career professional” or “techie” than a top executive.

Again, think about what organizations are looking for in an executive leader. If you need hints, study a handful of job descriptions that line up with the kind of role you’re eyeing. See those common threads and deliverables? I’ll bet you they’re much more executive focused than nitty-gritty technical details in nature. These are the things you need to hit heavy and hard on when constructing an executive level resume.

5. Use Formatting to Draw the Eye to the Most Important Stuff

Giant blobs of text aren’t going to win you any fans. Yes, by the time you reach “near executive” status in your career, you may have plenty to say. But no one wants to (nor will they) go on a fishing trip looking for evidence that you have the chops to be their next executive. You need to make sure that the best, most relevant stuff (e.g., your key accomplishments that demonstrate strategic thinking, influence and impact) is super easy to find.

When working on behalf of my own clients, I typically set up a “Select Highlights” subsection under each role the professional has held, and add two to three bullet points showcasing key wins or important results. And then I bold the most powerful phrases within those bullet points, so the reviewer’s eye goes right to the big things.

It’s a great way to control where the reviewer’s attention goes first. Just be sure and use consistency in your bullet points, as well as in how and what you decide to highlight in bold.

No matter who tells you what, there is not one perfect format or style for a winning executive resume. But there is one important rule—it’s on you to make yourself look like you’re ready for the role. If you can’t shape that message, you risk looking like a lower-level employee. This may not be the worst thing in the world, but if you’re aspiring to get to the top?

Your resume has to shout from the rooftops that you’ve got executive chops.

(Because, of course you do.)

https://www.themuse.com/advice/your-experience-is-no-longer-enough-5-resume-changes-executives-need-to-make

ARE YOU IN NEED OF TOP TALENT NOW? Don’t have the time to spend nor available bandwidth to look for your company’s perfect match? Does this leave you with projects undone, unable to launch new initiatives or deliver desired output, let alone to grow your profits? Is your hiring process stalled and limping along with unfilled requisitions? Discover the ease and satisfaction of partnering with experts whose ONLY mission is to accomplish laser-focused search and to acquire top-tier skill on your behalf, each and every day! Contact us at 415-234-0707 ext. 5 or email at connect@superiansources.com Find out what a customized service SAVES you in TIME, MONEY and RESOURCES!

 

ARE YOU TODAY’S TOP TALENT LOOKING FOR A NEW ROLE? Do you want assurance that you are represented by the best and have opportunities open to you within exceptional workplaces? Have you heard that being presented by a boutique search firm is the edge you need to get in the door and have your opportunity to shine? Contact us at 415-234-0707 or email at connect@superiansources.com – http://www.SuperianSources.com

5 Steps That’ll Take You From Thinking About Changing Careers to Actually Doing It

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Research continues to show that you’ll have numerous career paths in your lifetime. Millennials, for example, are expecting to stay in jobs less than three years and most undoubtedly will change careers as their idea of a dream job changes.

Whether you’re a few years into your career or in the middle of it, if you’ve ever attempted to change course, you know it isn’t easy. After all, you have a certain set of experiences, knowledge, and skills, and you can’t just do anything with them, can you?

Yet, you’ve targeted the next avenue you want to go down, but you have zero, zilch, nada on the five years of experience that employer wants to see in the ideal candidate. It’s frustrating enough to have you thinking you might as well just keep doing the same old thing, so convinced you are that you’ll never get hired without several years’ experience in the new field.

But that’s not the right mindset. There are ways to segue from one path to another, and here are five steps to help you get there.

1. Mentally Prepare

When you have the exact experience listed on the job description and you’re filling out online applications, those applicant-tracking systems (or ATS as they’re called) love you. The robots easily detect that you’re a good match, and when you’re moving from one role in your industry to a similar one, job searching seems not that bad.

When you’re making a pivot, however, it takes a bit more work. ATS aren’t able to make the connections that you can articulate. And you know where that lands you? The reject pile. Be aware of the challenge ahead of you—it’s the first step in succeeding in your career pivot.

2. Inventory Your Genius

I find most people don’t stop and look at what they can offer. When you see years of experience required on a job you want, and it isn’t a perfect match based on your work history, you get discouraged and quit the search altogether. Here’s a better option.

Evaluate your experience and identify the skills that are transferable; these are the ones you’re going to want to highlight as you promote yourself as a viable candidate.

The five-step ETHOS method I created for clients examines the experience you have and makes it relevant for where you’re headed. It’s kind of like re-purposing a piece of furniture or something in your wardrobe.

You can use this approach whether you’re fresh out of school, or mid-career making a pivot.

Start by taking one aspect of your job, and ask yourself these five questions:

  • E – What is the specific experience you have?
  • T – What are the tasks you performed?
  • H – How did you achieve those tasks, that is, what are the qualities you exhibited in the work?
  • O – What are the specific outcomes you achieved?
  • S – Now, voila, what are the skills you exhibited?

Say you work in supply chain and, after doing this analysis, you realize one of the things you are a genius at is using demand management tools to create pinpoint forecasts for purchasing. Instead of thinking, “So what, anybody can do that!” practice talking about yourself like this: “I’m good at analyzing vast quantities of data and making accurate forecasts. Now who else can I solve problems for using that skill?” Repeat this for each and every skill you come up with.

3. Investigate Your Dream Job

OK, so you’ve been thinking about moving into a marketing role. But you’re stuck because, I mean, supply chain personnel making a move to marketing? You can’t pinpoint the connection. Your friends and colleagues probably don’t see it either. So maybe asking them for advice isn’t your go-to strategy. Here’s a better one.

Talk to colleagues in marketing and people in your network who are in this industry you wish to move into. Learn about what they do, how they got there, and what they think a person needs to make it in this field. Ask them specically what skills and talent they believe are needed.

Notice I said you ask them about the skills and talent. You’re not asking about years of experience. You’ll also notice you’re not asking them if they know of any jobs you can apply for—right now, you’re in investigative mode, soaking up everything you can about this new industry.

4. Translate Your Brilliance

Now put the pieces of the puzzle together. Based on the conversations you’ve had, you should have a pretty good idea of what you need to make it in your new field. Armed with that knowledge, return to your ETHOS breakdown. Let’s see, you how to work in cross-functional teams, how to manage spending, keep projects on track, and delegate responsibilities. You’re well versed in creating decks on forecasts and programs too.

So basically, check, check, and check. Feeling more confident now? When you begin to realize that so much of what you do and have done is applicable to other types of work, the leap will feel less scary. Now you can go ahead and call the head of marketing to ask for time on her calendar.

5. Pitch Yourself in a New Way

Before you read this article, you might have been thinking about timidly approaching marketing—or whatever industry you’re itching to transition into—to see what jobs they had open. I hope I’ve disrupted your thinking about that. Because now you’re going to hit them up with a much more powerful and confident approach than if you’d reached out as soon as you got turned on by the new field.

When you meet with the head of marketing, the social media director, or the VP of sales, you’re going to want to make it clear that you’ve done your research and connected the dots for making this move. Share the “why” behind your desire to change careers from X to Y.

Finally, articulate why you’re a great candidate who should be hired. No matter what field you’re moving into, you want to sell yourself. But that’s not all you want to do. Instead of inquiring about open positions, have a conversation that demonstrates why you’re equipped to make this transition and what the company (or even the industry) stands to gain.

Working through the ETHOS exercise enables you to truly identify your skills and how they can be transferred. By building stories you can use in interviews, networking conversations and potential hiring managers, you’re on the path to proving what an excellent hire you are, regardless of how unorthodox your career change is.

https://www.themuse.com/advice/5-steps-thatll-take-you-from-thinking-about-changing-careers-to-actually-doing-it

ARE YOU IN NEED OF TOP TALENT NOW? Don’t have the time to spend nor available bandwidth to look for your company’s perfect match? Does this leave you with projects undone, unable to launch new initiatives or deliver desired output, let alone to grow your profits? Is your hiring process stalled and limping along with unfilled requisitions? Discover the ease and satisfaction of partnering with experts whose ONLY mission is to accomplish laser-focused search and to acquire top-tier skill on your behalf, each and every day! Contact us at 415-234-0707 ext. 5 or email at connect@superiansources.com Find out what a customized service SAVES you in TIME, MONEY and RESOURCES!

 

ARE YOU TODAY’S TOP TALENT LOOKING FOR A NEW ROLE? Do you want assurance that you are represented by the best and have opportunities open to you within exceptional workplaces? Have you heard that being presented by a boutique search firm is the edge you need to get in the door and have your opportunity to shine? Contact us at 415-234-0707 or email at connect@superiansources.com – http://www.SuperianSources.com

6 Basic Social Media Tips Job Searchers Still Need to Read (Because Mistakes Are Still Happening)

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You’ve heard this before: Be careful what you put online. After all, hiring managers turn to social media to learn things about you that your resume doesn’t reveal. But somehow, people are still making crucial mistakes.

That’s where we step in to give you tips straight from the mouths of people who are very good at stalking candidates online. As the founder of a recruitment firm for administrative and HR professionals, I want to make sure you know that whether you’re currently employed or job searching, the impression you give is based upon the totality of available information about you—that includes your Facebook page, Twitter postsLinkedIn profile, Tumblr account, Medium blogs, and anything else that’s considered public information.

So, while it may be super tempting to update your Facebook every single Monday with something about how much you dread going back to work after the weekend, you need to get your social media presence under control if you want to put forth the best possible first impression.

1. There’s a Line Between Fun and Unprofessional

Now that we’ve established that the very people you want to impress (your current or potential employers) are aware of your online presence and behavior, why would you want to risk posting information about yourself that could derail you from your next great opportunity—be that an advancement or new gig? We heard from one VP of HR who decided not to extend an offer to a candidate when she stumbled on the candidate’s Tumblr account with posts detailing the best way to roll a joint. Another client backed out of a confirmed interview after he came across a candidate’s Facebook page showcasing a picture of him playing beer bong and looking anything but sober. It’s not the kind of image your future place of employment wants to see when it’s evaluating your professionalism.

2. Audit Your Online Images

Go ahead, check yourself out. Does your LinkedIn profile picture convey the right message about you? Here’s a hint: The photo you use should not be the same one you use for your Tinder profile. You want one that’s professional, but not boring. Slice-of-life pictures that depict you doing something interesting, like hiking in the mountains or posing in front of the Eiffel Tower, as opposed to the expected headshot are perfectly suitable. While you’re at it, go ahead and sanitize (i.e., purge!) any other profile photos and albums you have living in your Facebook archive that you wouldn’t want to share with your future boss.

3. Make it Private

Double-check your privacy settings across all your profiles. It’s one thing for a potential employer to be able to find your Facebook account and see your profile pic; it’s a whole other thing for him to be able to read through your feed and scroll through all of your (what should be) private photos. Additionally, keep in mind that companies can and do change their policies at any given time, which could result in previously-private information becoming revealed. And private or not, your safest bet is to avoid putting anything out there that could be misconstrued. If it’s questionable, get rid of it.

4. Be Consistent

Remember, hiring managers are using your social media to obtain more information about you, as well as corroborate items on your resume or things you say during interviews. So, for example, if your resume portrays you as a marketing expert with years of experience in marketing, but your LinkedIn profile suggests your background is in business development, this could create doubt about what skills you actually have. If you’re choosing to highlight certain experiences (or downplay others), that’s OK, but be consistent about it. The same holds true for dates on your resume and LinkedIn—they need to match if you want to be credible.

5. Keep the Soapboxing to a Minimum

Just as your photos might convey an image of you that doesn’t match what a potential employer is looking for, so too can your written words. Keep your online opinions and commentary relatively non-controversial. A blog post about the best national parks for your next adventure holiday is far less likely to offend than one about your position on legalizing marijuana. It’s fine to take a political stand, but be classy about it. A spew of profanities about the party you don’t support instead of a clear statement describing your beliefs is off-putting and immature. If you’re not sure if it’s OK to post something, take that as a sign that you shouldn’t post it. And, if you’ve had a couple of drinks and are feeling emboldened by a buzz, you’re better off sleeping on it and deciding in the clear light of morning if you still want to publish that opinion.

6. Google Yourself

If you’re wondering what a potential employer is likely to discover about you, just do what he’s going to do: Google yourself. This is a great way to identify any remaining things you want to change or delete. If you need to, enlist a service for professional social media support, like ReputationDefender, which creates positive search results on your behalf. It can be nerve-wracking to think of your current manager checking out your online presence, but that’s all the more reason to get your digital self in order stat. You can even proactively generate content about yourself, too, by putting together a simple personal websitepublishing on LinkedIn Pulse, or Medium.

There’s something of an art form to filtering your online image and also being true to yourself. I’m by no means suggesting that you censor yourself to the point that you’re unrecognizable or attempt to be someone who supports causes you don’t really care about because you think it’ll make you look good. Putting on a fake front with the hopes of obtaining a job offer is obviously the wrong approach to polishing your online presence. And there’s also no reason to remove yourself from the online world you’ve created for yourself. Instead, look at it as curating yourself in an effort to make the best impression possible.

https://www.themuse.com/advice/6-basic-social-media-tips-job-searchers-still-need-to-read-because-mistakes-are-still-happening

 

ARE YOU IN NEED OF TOP TALENT NOW? Don’t have the time to spend nor available bandwidth to look for your company’s perfect match? Does this leave you with projects undone, unable to launch new initiatives or deliver desired output, let alone to grow your profits? Is your hiring process stalled and limping along with unfilled requisitions? Discover the ease and satisfaction of partnering with experts whose ONLY mission is to accomplish laser-focused search and to acquire top-tier skill on your behalf, each and every day! Contact us at 415-234-0707 ext. 5 or email at connect@superiansources.com Find out what a customized service SAVES you in TIME, MONEY and RESOURCES!

 

ARE YOU TODAY’S TOP TALENT LOOKING FOR A NEW ROLE? Do you want assurance that you are represented by the best and have opportunities open to you within exceptional workplaces? Have you heard that being presented by a boutique search firm is the edge you need to get in the door and have your opportunity to shine? Contact us at 415-234-0707 or email at connect@superiansources.com – http://www.SuperianSources.com