RETENTION MATTERS TO TALENT ACQUISITION TEAMS

Retention

 

Three things are usually off-limits when it comes to workplace conversations:

  1. Religion
  2. Politics
  3. Turnover

 

The first two are obvious: We don’t discuss hot topics in the workplace. But we don’t talk about the third one, turnover, because we believe we don’t have any control over it. It’s just one of those things that happens in organizational dynamics:

We’ve had turnover, and we’ll always have turnover. Now, let’s get back to talking about fun things like employment branding and candidate experience.”

Stop it! You’re better than that!

When I worked in human resources at Applebee’s, those were difficult times. The restaurant industry had massive turnover. Most companies had well over 100 percent turnover, which is a mathematical nightmare.

Applebee’s made it its mission to be the best in the industry at retaining talent. My region led the company in employee retention. We tried to have a vision and use metrics to our advantage. For every employee we could retain, it meant we had one less employee to hire and train. Turns out retention is significantly easier to do than hiring and training — and it costs less!

SO, HOW DID WE DO THAT — AND HOW CAN YOU REPLICATE IT?

1. USE DATA TO SEE IF YOU EMPLOY SOMEONE WHO IS IN A ROLE IN HIGH DEMAND.

Focus on what you need to do to retain them. Check out tools like CareerBuilder’s Supply and Demand to see how easy or hard it is to recruit for a specific role in your city.

2. UNDERSTAND WHY RETENTION IS SO IMPORTANT.

Retention is a strategic imperative for talent acquisition teams. It was the most important thing we talked about. It became a foundational and operational priority. Retention of employees became everyone’s job — from the recruiters who sourced and screened talent to the front-line supervisors in our restaurants.

3. MAKE TURNOVER AND RETENTION METRICS PUBLIC AND VISIBLE.

I firmly believe data is essential to tackling turnover issues, and that this information should be accessible to everyone in the company. From the CEO to the line cook, we had detailed metrics visible in every Applebee’s location. We used dashboards that were updated on a daily basis. No one could hide from the truth. Retention was a measure of the health of the business.

4. CREATE A “SAVE STRATEGY.”

We developed a plan to address talented employees at risk of leaving. We also aggressively courted those amazing workers who gave notice. Our strategy had a lot of moving parts, but the biggest part was an immediate reaction to finding out why they were leaving and learning what we could do to keep them. We gave authority to first-level leaders to take the action they needed to retain employees.

REMEMBER — RETENTION ISN’T SEXY.

We don’t talk about employee turnover in our organizations because we feel we have no real control over the outcome. We think that people are just going to leave, and that it’s the natural order of organizations. We also think that this falls outside of our responsibilities as talent acquisition professionals.

RETENTION MATTERS TO TALENT ACQUISITION LEADERS.

For those talent acquisition functions that are under water, retention should be your very first priority. Plug the holes in the dam first, and then worry about talent communities and candidate experience once you get the basics right. The last thing you want to do is bring more talent into an environment where they’re more likely to turnover as well.

An organization cannot move forward if you’re always replacing significant talent across all functions. Create and develop an environment where people want to stay and work and thrive, and your job as a talent acquisition professional gets easier.

Build it and they will stay. I promise you.

 

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6 Reasons You Really Need to Stop Comparing Your Career to Everyone Else’s

Theodore Roosevelt once said, “Comparison is the thief of joy.” Well, Teddy, I can’t help but agree. Oftentimes, seeing how you match up against others is a frustrating, discouraging, and simply unproductive use of your time.

Sure, sometimes there’s nothing like a little friendly competition to really give you a kick in the pants. But, in most cases, constantly comparing yourself—particularly your career—to others is pretty much a recipe for disaster.

Don’t believe me? Here are six reasons you should snap out of it and stop analyzing how you measure up to everyone else. Because, honestly, it really doesn’t matter.

1. It’s Probably Not Relevant

You just heard through the grapevine that your old high school boyfriend just landed this awesome job as an attorney at a high-profile law firm. Instead of feeling happy or proud, you’re immediately filled with intense jealousy.

“Ugh, he’s probably making so much money,” you think to yourself, “I wish I could score a super impressive job like his.”

But, guess what? You’re not even an attorney. You didn’t go to law school, nor have you ever had a desire to work in the legal field. Yet, it’s essentially human nature to see how you measure up to someone else—no matter how much (or how little) you have in common.

Comparing yourself to others is one thing. But, doing so when the other person’s background or industry isn’t even relevant? It’s just a demoralizing waste of time. Instead, pick a few influencers or accomplished professionals in your chosen field who really motivate and inspire you, and work toward achieving that same success. After all, you don’t need me to tell you that comparing apples to oranges just isn’t constructive.

2. It Doesn’t Set Healthy Goals

Of course, there’s nothing wrong with always working towards something. But, I never recommend busting your butt in order to keep up with the Jones’. It simply breeds discontentment. So, spend your time chipping away at the personal goals and ambitions that make you better and make you feel accomplished.

That’s right, constantly being so concerned with how everyone else is performing isn’t doing you any favors. So, set goals that’ll help you achieve what you want (and not just what looks impressive on your LinkedIn profile). You might be surprised with the results!

3. It’s Discouraging

Comparison is a funny thing. It can either make you feel really miserable and defeated, or really victorious and talented. But, more often than not, constantly matching yourself up against others is incredibly disheartening.

Perhaps your college friend just got a big promotion at the tech company where she works. Or, maybe that random acquaintance you Facebook-stalk just posted about that fancy award he received. Good for them! But, what does beating yourself over the head with that information really accomplish? Nothing, other than make you feel irritated, unappreciated, and unimportant.

Sure, seeing that your old college roommate is still scooping cones at her local dairy freeze might lift your spirits. But, that natural tendency is not only mean-spirited; it’s also a little counterproductive. You don’t want to spend your time feeling so superior that you neglect to recognize the areas where you can improve and grow. Then, you might just find yourself at the dairy freeze, too.

4. It’s an Unproductive Waste of Time

This should be obvious, but something positive and productive rarely comes out of comparing yourself to others. So, it’s essentially just a colossal waste of the precious time that you could be spending on other, more beneficial things.

Put an end to your self-deprecating Facebook scrolling and instead think of some actionable things you can do to actually improve yourself. Does your LinkedIn profile need a polish? Is there a professional workshop or seminar you’ve been meaning to sign up for? Are there some new projects you should add to your online portfolio?

Well, do those things now! It’s a much better use of your time than cyber-stalking your second grade pen pal.

5. It’s Not Always What it Seems

It comes as no surprise that people have the tendency to present the shiniest version of their lives—particularly on social media. So, don’t be tricked into thinking that you’re the only one who ever falls on hard times or faces an uphill battle.

That acquaintance who posted about finally taking the leap from her full-time job in order to freelance full-time? Well, of course she’s not going to mention that she was actually let go from her position. That college friend who’s taking some time off to travel and explore? He’s probably not going to post about the fact that he found himself in a job he hated, and now needs time to reevaluate his options.

Nope, things aren’t always as they seem. And, there’s really no use in comparing yourself to a mirage.

6. It’s Not a Measurement of Success

Yes, your career is a huge part of your life. But, how quickly you’re climbing the ladder? It’s not the only definition of a successful existence.

Do you enjoy your work? Do you have a loving and supportive family and group of friends? Are you healthy? Are you happy? If you answered “yes” to all—or even one—of these questions, then I’d say you’re doing pretty well for yourself.

It’s important to always remember that your career is just one slice of the pie. So, don’t let it be solely responsible for a rotten taste in your mouth.

I’ll admit that comparing yourself to others is natural. But, that doesn’t mean it’s valuable. Keep these reasons in mind, shut off that pesky voice in your head, and channel all of your energy into something more productive. At the very least, you’ll make Teddy Roosevelt proud!

https://www.themuse.com/advice/6-reasons-you-really-need-to-stop-comparing-your-career-to-everyone-elses

5 Small Work Victories That Are Worth Celebrating When You’re New at a Job

If you’re a beginning runner, you celebrate your first 5K finish. If you’re a rookie piano player, you revel in the first time you’re able to play any song besides “Chopsticks.” If you’re a novice baker, you throw up a fist pump the first time your soufflé doesn’t sink.

But when it comes to the first few weeks of a new job, there’s usually not much celebrating—only an intense focus on getting through each day without bumbling your responsibilities or making huge, company-foiling mistakes.

However, taking a moment to celebrate little victories can remind you that you’re getting closer to proficiency in your role—and overall career success—every day.

So if you’re looking for a milestone to celebrate, be on the lookout for these five.

1. Completing an Assignment Without Asking for Help

“What program do you use for expenses?”
“How do I book my travel?”
“What does this error mean?”
“Can you help me set up this spreadsheet?”
“Where’s the coffee?”

It’s the bane of a new hire’s existence: To do virtually anything, you have to ask for help.

While there’s no shame in asking your co-workers for assistance, it feels really good that first time you’re able to make it through a project or assignment without asking for help. It means you’re capable, confident, and on your way to mastering your role.

2. Wondering “Where Did the Time Go?”

After a couple weeks of feeling completely lost in my first managerial role, I clearly remember looking at the clock on my computer at 5:30 PM one evening and wondering where the day went.

Or, it can happen with a single task. You start an assignment, and what seems like five minutes later, you look up—and realize it’s actually been two hours. But you didn’t notice the time passing because you were so captivated by your work.

In the first few weeks of a new job, you’ll probably feel hesitant or unsure—and because of that, time might pass slowly. So when you first experience that moment when you’re so engrossed in your role that time flies, celebrate. That means you’ve found work that you enjoy and can fully immerse yourself in.

3. Moving on After a Mistake

As the office newcomer, you’re under a lot of pressure to perform well. Out of dozens—maybe hundreds—of applicants, the company picked you to fill this role. And now your teammates are expecting you to meet all of their expectations.

That pressure can make it difficult to move on after a mistake. Even if the misstep was minor, you may find yourself fretting over it for days, rehearsing the perfect apology to deliver to your manager, and wondering if the company will take back its decision to hire you.

But there will come a day when you make a blunder and can move on gracefully. You’ll know exactly how to react, how to fix the mistake, and how to move forward without agonizing over if it will affect your tenure at the company. And that’s something to take note of—because it means you’re confident in your role and your place in the organization.

4. Enjoying a Workday From Start to Finish

Most days, especially when you’re new to your job, you’re going to experience quite a few ups and downs. You’ll learn something new; then you’ll ask a dumb question. You’ll befriend a co-worker; then you’ll get lost on your way to the break room. You may enjoy your new role—but only during the moments when you’re not completely embarrassing yourself.

But eventually, you’ll go through an entire day and realize you enjoyed every part of it.

Sure, maybe you faced challenges. But you enjoyed the problem-solving process and using your creativity to find a solution. Maybe you were faced with an intimidating new assignment. But you collaborated with a co-worker to figure out how to work through it. And at the end of the day, all you’re left with is a sense of pride and accomplishment.

It won’t happen every day (even for people who work in their absolute dream jobs). But when it happens, revel in it—it’s a great achievement and a sign of good things to come.

5. Taking a New Employee Under Your Wing

At some point, you won’t be the newest employee anymore. Someone new will join your team or department—and he will look to you to help him find his way within the company.

That won’t necessarily mean you’ve mastered your role completely. But it gives you the chance to be the one answering questions instead of asking them or offering to lend a hand instead of begging for help.

And when you’re still relatively new to your position, that is quite a victory.

As a new employee, you may feel like you’re walking on eggshells. But celebrating even small wins can give you a boost of confidence and remind you that you’re capable of great things. You’ve proven yourself in these achievements already—and there are only bigger victories ahead.

How to Go Big at Work Without Burning Out Fast

You’ve got the best gig ever and you’re going full-force. You love the feeling of getting things done and being hailed as one of the up-and-comers in your organization—and you want to go all the way to the top.

As a high-performing high-achiever, you may think you can muscle your way to success by doing more, working more, and being, well, more valuable than anyone else on the team.

But there’s a dark side to that. As a high achiever, you’re predisposed to being a victim of burnout. When you’re incredibly passionate about what you do, you can easily forget that long hours, nonstop work, and saying yes to extra assignments may boost your career in the short term. But in the long run, it can send you into a flameout spiral.

You may not even see that burnout coming; it creeps up on you insidiously as you drive yourself to physical and emotional exhaustion.

The best way to avoid it—without sacrificing your commitment to success? Take a few proactive measures while your star is rising, and when you get to the top, you’ll have a great set of career best practices that will take you wherever you want to go.

Keep Your Priorities Crystal Clear

My client, Jason, was top talent—there was no question about that. He was an emerging account manager in the finance industry. He was putting in tons of hours, and his clients gave him rave reviews.

At times, though, he wasn’t sure which issue should get his attention or why. He didn’t have clearly defined goals and wasn’t sure at all how his performance would be measured. Without a sense of direction in his job, he was headed straight toward burnout.

Unclear goals are one of the most powerful drivers of burnout. Without clear goals, you can’t set priorities, and without priorities, you can’t perform your job to the best of your ability. Instead, you’ll spread your energy over numerous, time-consuming tasks. You’ll lack a sense of accomplishment and satisfaction, which will inevitably lead you to exhaustion.

As your star is rising, get clear on the deliverables and outcomes you’re responsible for and how you’ll be measured. Then, stay laser focused on those priorities each and every day.
A simple way to do that? Serial entrepreneur Grant Cardone writes down his goals first thing every day—which helps him stay focused on them.

Get Fit

When Lena Dunham’s character recently began running in the latest season of Girls, she noted the side benefits of the exercise. “It ain’t about the ass,” she said. “It’s about the brain.”

And oh man, did she get that right. Studies continue to extol fitness as an amplifier for career success. Exercise gives you more stamina and brainpower, helps you deal more effectively with stress, and promotes a positive self-image—all of which help fuel your career goals while keeping you far from burnout.

Know Your Motivation

Business icon and Harvard professor Clayton Christensen defines motivation as “an engine inside of you that drives you to keep working in order to feel successful and to help the organization be successful. It causes you to keep at it through thick and thin.”

When you think about the meaning and satisfaction you get from your work, focus on learning, growing, and being part of a great team. Those are the attributes of your work that will give feed you with a sense of reward.

Focusing too heavily on extrinsic motivation—such as a paycheck, raises, or promotions—as your only sense of reward will burn you out.

Create Your Trademark Routines

You know how Mark Zuckerberg wears a gray t-shirt every day? He does it so he doesn’t have to spend energy on clothing decisions and can instead spend it on more important matters. His routine of wearing a “work uniform” makes him more efficient and productive.

Michael Phelps, owner of 22 Olympic medals in swimming, starts each morning with sets of stretching, warm-up swims, and drills that keep him physically sharp.

Routines are a series of habits, which mitigate all the minor decision-making (and sometimes waffling) that drains your energy.

How many times have you had that argument with yourself about whether to go work out on a cold winter morning? With a routine, you just know you’re going to go. It’s a commitment you make and follow up on.

OK, so you don’t need to wear the same clothes every day. But let’s say one of your career excellence routines is to do your three hardest tasks first thing in the morning. And you do that every single day. Rain or shine. No argument. You’ll be on your way to success, without wasting any energy and risking career fatigue.

Make Smart Decisions About Your Time

We’ve all been there: It’s 10:30 PM and you’re scrolling through the inbox. You read one message about an issue, your mind starts racing, and within minutes, you’re in full-blown work mode.

It’s easy to be always “on” in our uber-connected world. But that doesn’t mean returning emails, texts, or Snapchats at all hours of the day and night is a good way to spend your time. When you work at all hours, you’ll feel like you never stop working.

Chances are a lot of that work is not high value. And if you don’t feel like you’re doing high-value work, you’ll burn out for sure.

It’s cool to check your devices out of the office, but be intentional about it. For example, tell yourself you’ll check email at 8:30 PM, and then only respond to the most important messages and log off by 9 PM. Then you won’t be tempted to keep dipping into email until all hours of the night. Remember, not all work is important work.

It’s easy to get lost in a job you love. But even when you love your work, too much of a good thing is, well, too much. Start now to stay laser focused on your goals, your health, and the decisions you make about how you spend your time. Your career, your boss, and your own body will thank you.

How to Go Big at Work Without Burning Out Fast

You’ve got the best gig ever and you’re going full-force. You love the feeling of getting things done and being hailed as one of the up-and-comers in your organization—and you want to go all the way to the top.

As a high-performing high-achiever, you may think you can muscle your way to success by doing more, working more, and being, well, more valuable than anyone else on the team.

But there’s a dark side to that. As a high achiever, you’re predisposed to being a victim of burnout. When you’re incredibly passionate about what you do, you can easily forget that long hours, nonstop work, and saying yes to extra assignments may boost your career in the short term. But in the long run, it can send you into a flameout spiral.

You may not even see that burnout coming; it creeps up on you insidiously as you drive yourself to physical and emotional exhaustion.

The best way to avoid it—without sacrificing your commitment to success? Take a few proactive measures while your star is rising, and when you get to the top, you’ll have a great set of career best practices that will take you wherever you want to go.

Keep Your Priorities Crystal Clear

My client, Jason, was top talent—there was no question about that. He was an emerging account manager in the finance industry. He was putting in tons of hours, and his clients gave him rave reviews.

At times, though, he wasn’t sure which issue should get his attention or why. He didn’t have clearly defined goals and wasn’t sure at all how his performance would be measured. Without a sense of direction in his job, he was headed straight toward burnout.

Unclear goals are one of the most powerful drivers of burnout. Without clear goals, you can’t set priorities, and without priorities, you can’t perform your job to the best of your ability. Instead, you’ll spread your energy over numerous, time-consuming tasks. You’ll lack a sense of accomplishment and satisfaction, which will inevitably lead you to exhaustion.

As your star is rising, get clear on the deliverables and outcomes you’re responsible for and how you’ll be measured. Then, stay laser focused on those priorities each and every day.
A simple way to do that? Serial entrepreneur Grant Cardone writes down his goals first thing every day—which helps him stay focused on them.

Get Fit

When Lena Dunham’s character recently began running in the latest season of Girls, she noted the side benefits of the exercise. “It ain’t about the ass,” she said. “It’s about the brain.”

And oh man, did she get that right. Studies continue to extol fitness as an amplifier for career success. Exercise gives you more stamina and brainpower, helps you deal more effectively with stress, and promotes a positive self-image—all of which help fuel your career goals while keeping you far from burnout.

Know Your Motivation

Business icon and Harvard professor Clayton Christensen defines motivation as “an engine inside of you that drives you to keep working in order to feel successful and to help the organization be successful. It causes you to keep at it through thick and thin.”

When you think about the meaning and satisfaction you get from your work, focus on learning, growing, and being part of a great team. Those are the attributes of your work that will give feed you with a sense of reward.

Focusing too heavily on extrinsic motivation—such as a paycheck, raises, or promotions—as your only sense of reward will burn you out.

Create Your Trademark Routines

You know how Mark Zuckerberg wears a gray t-shirt every day? He does it so he doesn’t have to spend energy on clothing decisions and can instead spend it on more important matters. His routine of wearing a “work uniform” makes him more efficient and productive.

Michael Phelps, owner of 22 Olympic medals in swimming, starts each morning with sets of stretching, warm-up swims, and drills that keep him physically sharp.

Routines are a series of habits, which mitigate all the minor decision-making (and sometimes waffling) that drains your energy.

How many times have you had that argument with yourself about whether to go work out on a cold winter morning? With a routine, you just know you’re going to go. It’s a commitment you make and follow up on.

OK, so you don’t need to wear the same clothes every day. But let’s say one of your career excellence routines is to do your three hardest tasks first thing in the morning. And you do that every single day. Rain or shine. No argument. You’ll be on your way to success, without wasting any energy and risking career fatigue.

Make Smart Decisions About Your Time

We’ve all been there: It’s 10:30 PM and you’re scrolling through the inbox. You read one message about an issue, your mind starts racing, and within minutes, you’re in full-blown work mode.

It’s easy to be always “on” in our uber-connected world. But that doesn’t mean returning emails, texts, or Snapchats at all hours of the day and night is a good way to spend your time. When you work at all hours, you’ll feel like you never stop working.

Chances are a lot of that work is not high value. And if you don’t feel like you’re doing high-value work, you’ll burn out for sure.

It’s cool to check your devices out of the office, but be intentional about it. For example, tell yourself you’ll check email at 8:30 PM, and then only respond to the most important messages and log off by 9 PM. Then you won’t be tempted to keep dipping into email until all hours of the night. Remember, not all work is important work.

It’s easy to get lost in a job you love. But even when you love your work, too much of a good thing is, well, too much. Start now to stay laser focused on your goals, your health, and the decisions you make about how you spend your time. Your career, your boss, and your own body will thank you.